Marketing New Year resolutions for 2019

17 Jan, 2019
By Mark Baines

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It looks like being a BIG year for us all. Brexit, whatever form it takes, will cause change and into this dynamic marketplace we will be expected to produce the same, or better results than before.

Also the pressure on the online retailers as well as the High Street at Christmas will percolate down to us all – we are dependent on growing and active markets to fuel the economy. If consumers are no longer prepared to put themselves into debt then we will witness a slowdown.

This may be a good thing on a moral and macro-economic viewpoint but it will pass on short term pain to the professional service sector, as well as all our clients in engineering, technology, aviation etc.

Therefore these are the resolutions which will be essential for marketers in 2019:

 

Be more creative to achieve cut through:

Cutting through the noise has long been a challenge for marketers, and with estimations that the average person sees thousands of websites, adverts and other companies materials every day, making an impact is no small task.

This means a renewed focus on creativity. There’s been a massive acceleration in demand for UX design. When a person’s first experience of a brand is likely to be their website or app, design is key.

However, creativity goes beyond good UX design. In 2018, brands have truly recognised that all customer-facing communications are an opportunity for engagement, and UX writers are transforming these traditionally mundane messages into real customer experiences. On the opposite end of the spectrum, visual search has enabled marketers across the retail sector to reconnect with time-poor consumers.

 

Omnichannel marketing is vital

In 2019, omnichannel marketing will be of increasing importance as marketers look to build fully integrated customer experiences, and nurture better relationships with their audience.

The rise and rise of Instagram has been influential, but the best campaigns are those that use multiple marketing mediums, or at least consider the impact of each, instead of putting all the eggs (and budget) in one basket. In changing times, more marketers are implementing campaigns that see print and digital work hand in hand to good effect.

 

Stay on top of marketing regulations

If changing consumer behaviour wasn’t enough for marketers to contest with, an increased regulatory landscape has sent many into a tailspin. The introduction of GDPR in May made getting data right a legal imperative – but six months later, CIM (the Chartered Institute of Marketing) research found that 42% of consumers have received communications from businesses they did not given permission to contact them in the six months since the new data rules came into force. This is compared with 48% at the time GDPR took effect.

Therefore the fight against irresponsible data use shows no sign of slowing. As of this week, the Information Commissioner’s Office can now hold company bosses directly responsible for unsolicited nuisance telephone calls.

Speaking on the issue earlier this year, Guy Parker, chief executive of the ASA (Advertising Standards Authority), told CIM: “Effective regulation is good for companies because it helps provide a level playing field for everyone. Those who don’t stick to the rules face consequences. By ensuring higher standards, effective regulation gives people more confidence in the claims companies are making.”

 

My thanks to CIM ‘Exchange’ for the figures and quote above.

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